Milwaukee Chamber Theatre

Reviews

 

  • April 16, 2012read more

    by Matthew Reddin, Third Coast Digest; William Inge’s Bus Stop is a play with a simple premise: A snowstorm strands five travelers at a diner in ‘50s-era Kansas, forcing their lives to intersect with each other and with the lives of the diner’s employees. As Milwaukee Chamber Theatre does it, the execution is anything but simple. This complex, powerful play shouldn’t be missed.

     
  • April 16, 2012read more

    by Paul Kosidowski, InsideMilwaukee.com (Milwaukee Magazine); ...this beautifully rendered production certainly shows that Inge isn’t simply a purveyor of Heartland hokum.

     
  • April 16, 2012read more

    by Peggy Sue Dunigan, PS Performing Arts.com; Often admired as the “Playwright of the Midwest,” William Inge gleaned inspiration from the people he met in America’s heartland.

     
  • February 23, 2012read more

    by Damien Jaques, OnMilwaukee.com; "A Thousand Words" is a smart and entertaining drama that deserves to receive more productions across the country. Even off-Broadway should not be beyond its grasp.

     
  • February 21, 2012read more

    by Anne Siegel, Shepherd Express; Thankfully, it doesn't take “a thousand words” to describe the world premiere that opened at the Broadway Theatre Center's intimate Studio Theatre on Friday. In fact, only a few will do: “brilliant,” “witty,” “well crafted” and “entertaining.” There's also the word “go,” as in, “go see this show.”

     
  • February 20, 2012read more

    by Paul Kosidowski, Inside Milwaukee.com; ...It’s just one of the many cannily rendered scenes in Gwendolyn Rice’s new play, which is receiving its world premiere in a joint production by MCT and Madison’s Forward Theatre...

     
  • January 22, 2012read more

    by Lindsay Christians, 77 Square; How an artist changes the people around him, whether it's with a photograph, a compliment or a famous legacy, is at the core of Gwendolyn Rice's insightful play "A Thousand Words,"

     
  • Participating in a round table before the New York opening of “A Lovely Sunday for Creve Coeur” in 1979, Tennessee Williams identified “loneliness” as the “main theme” of this rarely produced play. That didn’t deter Milwaukee Chamber Theatre artistic director C. Michael Wright from including “Creve Coeur” in the current Chamber season, resulting in an exceptionally well-acted production that opened Friday night under Leda Hoffmann’s direction.

     
  • For a play that is so riotously funny, the laughs easily give way to the famed Tennessee Williams sorrow in "A Lovely Sunday for Creve Coeur."

     
  • Chris Klopatek, an accomplished comic actor, succeeds in a darker role in "Lobby Hero."

     

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